Heritage

Historic Landscape Characterisation

Historic Landscape Characterisation (HLC) is an archaeological method used to define and map the historic and archaeological dimension of the present day landscape. It forms part of a National Programme developed by English Heritage in the early nineties and is continually evolving with ongoing development and changes in methodology, technology and application.

The North Wessex Downs Historic Landscape Characterisation dataset was completed in 2006.

Historic Landscape Characterisation Dataset April 2012


Diversity in Stone Leaflet

In partnership with Oxfordshire Geology Trust and Berkshire Geoconservation Group, we have produced a leaflet to demonstrate the diversity building materials such as chalk, sarsen, flints and clay used over the centuries to create the built environment. The aim is to raise awareness of the need for geoconservation in terms of landscape and architecture. Why not download the leaflet and see if you can find any examples where you live?

Diversity in Stone Leaflet


Woodland Archaeology Handbook

Woodlands play a vital contribution to the natural and cultural heritage of the NWD and include nationally important examples of wood pasture, historic parkland, ancient and semi-natural woodland as well as more recent plantations and shelter-belts. Perhaps surprisingly, very little is known about the archaeology within these woodlands. Because of the tree canopy, even large features are hidden from air photographic surveys, while a general lack of access also plays a part.

Woodland Archaeology is a relatively new area in archaeological research. Methods of fieldwork are still developing, and it is expected that this project will develop and change over time as a result of volunteer feedback.


Veteran Trees Project

Veteran Trees can tell us tales of their lives, of when they were planted and what they provided for the people who lived near them. They can tell how the land was used and give clues to the age of the landscape features they stand on. To add to this, their scars and rugged barks provide homes and food supplies for a multitude of wildlife from fungi and invertebrates to birds and mammals.

These leaflets provide information of the veteran trees at Bucklebury and Ashampstead.